Walk on Holy Ground

This particular post is one that has taken time. Time in reflection, prayer, writing, and more reflection, prayer, and writing. Over the course of several weeks, this post has come into existence through reflection and study of what I believe could be argued, one of the most pivotal moments in Biblical history: Moses’ encounter with God at the burning bush.

Enjoy.

And the angel of the LORD appeared to him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush. He looked, and behold, the bush was burning, yet it was not consumed. And Moses said, “I will turn aside to see this great sight, why the bush is not burned.” When the LORD saw that he turned aside to see, God called to him out of the bush, “Moses, Moses!” And he said, “Here I am.” Then he said, “Do not come near; take your sandals off your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.”

Exodus 3:2-5

The story of Moses is one that has been told and retold. Plays, movies, songs, and the general reading of the account; in some fashion most people have heard the story to some degree.

Moses was such a pivotal player in God’s redemption of Israel from Egypt. Throughout time in the Hebrew culture and Jewish faith, he is revered and honored. The author of the first five books of the Bible, he led one of the greatest exodus’s of a people in history through a miraculous journey that lasted 40 years.

But like most people God tasks with great things, Moses wasn’t looking for an opportunity to be a leader. Remember, years before he rejected the opportunity to be part of the ruling class in Egypt. Moses has a past of murder and embarrassment, guilt that literally drove him into the desert.

Some time later we find him as a shepherd of his father-in-law’s sheep. Living a nomadic life far away from the palace and royalty he grew up surrounded by.

Then one day he experiences something so strange he can’t ignore it. A bush consumed with fire, but not by it. An angel of the LORD standing at it. A sight Moses had to examine more closely.

What began with curiosity quickly led to humility.

When the LORD saw that he turned aside to see, God called to him out of the bush, “Moses, Moses!” And he said, “Here I am.”

Exodus 3:4

Moses clearly understood who beckoned him to this place. And now He called him by name. This was no longer an exploratory adventure for Moses of what surely seemed to be an anomaly from afar. This was a divine interaction with the Creator of the universe. And the expectation of being in such a presence is not surprising.

Then he said, “Do not come near; take your sandals off your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.”

Exodus 3:5

God called Moses to enter into a holy place. To leave the ordinary, and allow himself to be consumed with the presence of God. Moses had a life changing mission tasked to him, used by God to change the world forever.

And it started with removing his sandals and entering holy ground.

We are called to do the same. As followers of Jesus we are called, invited to commune with God on holy ground. To let go of doing things our way, lean on Him and trust that He has the solution. Trust He will provide. It begins with leaving the ordinary behind, and allowing ourselves to be completely consumed by God. It takes stepping on holy ground.

This goes beyond a flippant encounter with God. It requires us to face questions. Do we grasp the weight of what it means to freely enter the presence of God? Do we possess a sense of humility and reverence when we present our requests to the Creator of everything? Do we understand the significance of God’s holiness we so often approach with arrogance?

It’s time.

Let go, humbly present yourself before the LORD God.

Be consumed by His presence, and walk with Him on holy ground.

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